Capped: Chris Tanev’s Extension

by Chris Pudsey on March 26, 2015 | (0 Comments)
  • Capped
  • Capped: Chris Tanev’s Extension

ChrisTanev

Looking at the fantasy hockey implications of Chris Tanev's new contract.

 

On Tuesday, the Vancouver Canucks locked up a key piece of their future by re-signing Chris Tanev to a new five-year, $22.25M contract, at an annual cap hit of $4.45M. The contract will break down like this; Tanev will receive $3.5M for the first two years; $5M in years three and four; and $5.25M in the final year. There is also a limited no-trade clause for all five years of the new deal. His current deal is about to expire, which sees him making $2M.

 

To say Tanev took the long way to this point would be a bit of an understatement. He couldn’t make Triple-A teams in his area so he played high school hockey. A growth spurt during his time playing for the Ontario provincial junior league caught the eye of recruiters for an US College, the Rochester Institute of Technology so he went there to play hockey. Dave Gagner, who was actually his roller-blade hockey coach earlier in life, and the Canucks Director of Player Development, followed Tanev’s career while he was at R.I.T and always thought Tanev had a very high hockey IQ. Tanev would go undrafted by the NHL so Gagner, and the Canucks, ended up signing the free agent.

 

In his first pro season, he played 39 games for the Manitoba Moose and 29 games for the Canucks. He also got into 14 playoff games for the Moose that year and five for the Canucks. 

 

The next couple seasons, he would bounce back and forth between the AHL and NHL until last year when he finally stuck around with the Canucks. He would play 64 games in his first full NHL season, scoring six goals and adding 11 helpers.

 

Tanev has never been known as an offensive force on the blue line. Since turning pro back in 2010/11, his career high in goals was last year when he sniped six goals. This year, his goals have dropped to two so far but he has tied a career high in assists with 14. 

 

Using the Frozen Pool tool, let’s take a look at Tanev’s career numbers.

 

SEASON

GP

G

A

P

PntPG

+/-

PIM

Shots

SH%

HITS

PPG

PPP

SHG

BLKS

PPTOI

%PP

%SH

TOI/G

%TOI

2014-2015

61

2

14

16

0.26

11

10

45

0.04

21

0

1

0

153

00:19

6.5

50.2

21:01

34.8

2013-2014

64

6

11

17

0.27

13

8

65

0.09

25

0

0

1

136

00:13

3.9

51.6

20:44

33.8

2012-2013

38

2

5

7

0.18

4

10

20

0.10

14

0

0

0

61

00:07

1.9

28.0

17:17

28.2

2011-2012

25

0

2

2

0.08

11

2

15

0.00

10

0

0

0

43

00:06

1.9

17.4

16:43

27.3

2010-2011

29

0

1

1

0.03

0

0

15

0.00

10

0

1

0

32

00:04

1.3

8.4

13:47

22.7

 

As we can see, his TOI numbers have increased with each season. We can also see that he’s a career plus player. In fact, with the exception of his rookie season, he was a plus player every year, and an even player in his rookie season. Considering he’s mainly used as a shutdown type defenseman, that’s an impressive stat in itself. He has also improved his blocks every year as well. 

 

Let’s take a look and see where Tanev, and his new cap hit square off against five other NHL defensemen who are making a similar cap hit. Right now, this is what their numbers all look like:

 

Name

Team

Age

Cap Hit

Pts

PPP

Hits

Blks

PIMs

+/-

Chris Tanev

VAN

25

$4.45

16

0

21

153

10

11

Fedor Tyutin

CBJ

31

$4.5

14

0

99

108

40

9

Anton Stralman

TB

28

$4.5

36

12

92

68

26

23

Jack Johnson

CBJ

28

$4.357

33

20

146

113

36

-18

Dmitri Kulikov

FLA

24

$4.333

18

3

95

82

46

-4

Jonathan Ericsson

DET

31

$4.25

14

0

99

50

64

-6

 

Both Stralman and Johnson are obviously a more offensively gifted type of defenseman, but Johnson also offers lots of other peripherals. Tanev is certainly a block machine compared to all of these guys and fairs pretty well on the plus/minus as well. 

 

In regards to fantasy hockey, usingFantasy Hockey Geek, let’s take a look at how these same players shake out for rankings in my fantasy league, the UHL.  For those that don’t know, the UHL is a 24-team, Salary Cap Dynasty League that is populated by many regulars here on Dobber Hockey.  The league uses the following stat categories for scoring for skater; G, A, Plus/Minus, PIM, SOG, GWG, PPP, SHP, Hits, Blocks and FOW.  Each team rosters a total 23 skaters and we use the same salary cap number as the NHL.

 

Name

UHL Rank

Chris Tanev

361

Fedor Tyutin

239

Anton Stralman

153

Jack Johnson

159

Dmitry Kulikov

346

Jonathan Ericsson

331

 

From what we can see, Anton Stralman is the highest ranked defenseman listed. The interesting thing about Stralman, he is a free agent in the UHL. When the Tampa Bay Lightning signed him last year, he was dropped because his GM didn’t expect him to perform to this level considering the price tag he came along with. In fact, he managed to stay unsigned all season long. Tyutin and Ericsson are also free agents in the UHL. 

 

Tanev is the lowest ranked player on that list, although he is certainly close to Ericsson and another disappointing player in Kulikov. It will be interesting to see if the current owner of Tanev decides to retain him at the end of this year or release him to free agency. If I had to assume, I’d say he would be a free agent at the first possible chance.

 

What does this new contract mean for the Vancouver Canucks?

 

Tanev, 25, is a key piece to their long-term future on the backend. After giving the Canucks a bit of a hometown discount last year, they rewarded their steady rear-guard with some long-term stability at a very good compensation rate. Tanev has consistently proven doubters wrong and is as reliable as they come. In regards to the numbers most teams look at, Tanev is the Canucks best Corsi defenseman this year, but is still behind guys like Dan Hamhuis, Kevin Bieksa and Alex Edler in regards to pay cheques. Head Coach Willie Desjardins thinks the best is yet to come for Tanev and considering his age, he may very well be right. Most defensemen don’t really hit their stride until they are 26-27 years old so time will tell if Tanev has more to give.

The Final Word

 

For fantasy hockey cap leagues, this really isn’t a great deal for fantasy owners. Tanev doesn’t bring enough of anything other than blocks and plus/minus to make him worth rostering in larger leagues, but it all depends on your league set-up in regards to the salary cap. At this price point, there will be better options out there for your fantasy roster.

 

Tanev is a much better “real life” defenseman than fantasy asset. Ask any Canuck fan or person in their organization and most will tell you Tanev has been the Canucks most consistent defenseman all season long. In real life, this is a fair deal for both sides.  Tanev gets a substantial raise and job security after signing two straight one-year contracts. The Canucks get a solid, calm, defenseman who can be trusted when the games on the line.  In real life, I see this as a win-win for both parties. 

 

Comments are closed.